Please share how you record to a MacBook Pro?

Not sure how to use my existing equipment and would love some help. Please share your mic connections and headphones ideally for two people. Bonus if you have pics. Note: I use Adobe audition to record in and won’t change that.

Chris Smith posted to Podcasting Equipment on

7 comments
  • DM profile image

    about 5 months ago

    If you’re looking to scale up to more people eventually, a RODEcaster interface would be a good investment. Otherwise, there are other smaller interfaces like the Scarlett 2i2 where you can plug in 2 XLR mics: Good low cost XLR mics: Rode Pro & Shure MV7X Good high end XLR mic: Shure SM7B We use the mv7x and sm7b in our studios You may want a powered headphone splitter like the Behringer HA400

    • RP profile image

      about 5 months ago

      We help people build home studio set ups, and this is some of the equipment that we usually recommend for multiple users. I’m sure there are also tons of other alternatives. I just happen to know and like these brands

  • GP

    about 5 months ago

    You didn’t say what microphones you use. Are they XLR or USB? One USB mic will work if you have a mic with a headphone jack built directly into it in order to monitor yourself. Beyond that single mic, you’ll need an interface if you want separate voice tracks in Audition…which I use too, and will never give up! I started with a Focusrite Scarlett and pre-amps (RE20 mic) then upgraded to the Rodecaster (with Cloudlifters: (RE27 and SM7B), then to the Rodecaster 2. The beauty of the Rodecaster is that it’s plug-and-play simple and ends the “essential” gear run around freeing you up to just focus on the show. Plug in the mics, plug the rig into the Mac’s USB, adjust mic levels/sound on the board, record. These boards aren’t cheap, but once I did the math for everything that’s needed to have multiple guests (including over the phone) with a professional sound, it’s the most cost effective way to go. I’d highly recommend the new version Rodecaster just b/c of the stronger pre-amps, but the older ones are still great, a bit cheaper, and still readily available. I’d advise going new but I have my first one, with Cloudlifters, if you’re wanting to save money.

  • IM profile image

    about 5 months ago

    I currently have a shure sm58 that I would plug into my H6 and then my PC. I don’t think I need a sound mixer (bad advice I got). I want to be able to record on my own and record in person with guests. Also have my headsets

    • TG

      about 5 months ago

      The H6 and mics for each participant are _almost_ everything you need. The H6 is highly capable and versatile, but it requires a little learning to use it for podcasting (that's why I created a course about it—message me if you want the link). The main thing you need is a headphone splitter. For a portable setup, I recommend the Rolls HA204p headphone amp to split the headphone signal from the H6 into multiple headphone outputs with separate volume controls. The HA204p is pricey, but it's battery-powered. But at $129, I would actually suggest you sell your H6 and switch to a Zoom Podtrak P4 which already has a headphone-splitter and is easier to use for podcasting than the H6. Also ensure each mic has its own stand to get close enough to your guests.

  • PN profile image

    about 5 months ago

    What’s your current setup? What are you aiming to accomplish?

    • CS

      about 5 months ago

      I currently have a shure sm58 that I would plug into my H6 and then my PC. I don’t think I need a sound mixer (bad advice I got). I want to be able to record on my own and record in person with guests. Also have my headsets